Deciding to take your life on the road is exciting! But before you leap headfirst into your new lifestyle, take some time to learn about both the pros and cons of RVing full time. Doing so will allow you to make an informed decision about whether or not becoming a round-the-clock RVer is genuinely ideal for you.

The Good Stuff

Living life on the road has many perks—here are just a few.

RV Living Tends To Be More Cost-Effective

One of the positive characteristics of life on the road is its tendency to be more cost-effective. With residential homes, you have to worry about significant mortgage payments, utilities, and maintenance or repairs. However, with an RV as your dwelling, your “rent” will likely only cost a few hundred bucks a month.

Or, if you’re in a position to do so, you could buy a camper outright and not worry about rent payments at all. You have to account for expenses like gas, insurance, and campsite fees. Even so, in most cases, the cost of RVing full time is still far less than that of a traditional home.

There’s More Opportunity To Travel

Of course, we can’t discuss the pros and cons of RVing full time without mentioning how it provides vast travel opportunities. As an RVer, you get the benefit of your home being mobile. This means that you can visit (and live) in any destination your heart desires, given that you don’t have to cross the ocean to get there.

Plus, because many RV parks and resorts are on or near campsites, you get to embrace the outdoors and enjoy nature more often. And if you’re worried about missing out on creature comforts, don’t be! RVs come with all manner of hookups and adaptors that ensure you’ll be able to enjoy fully functional bathrooms and kitchens and even your favorite movies.

The Challenging Stuff

It wouldn’t be fair to discuss all the lovely stuff about life on the road without touching on some of the challenges that come with it. Here are a few downsides of RVing full time.

RVs Are Compact Living Spaces

RVs may be more cost-effective, but they’re also compact. This means that you’ll have considerably less space.

The lack of space means that you’ll have to be extra particular about what’s worth taking on the road and what isn’t. Additionally, the tiny kitchen and bathrooms make it harder to cook more extravagant meals. Most models also don’t come with a bathtub. Thus, if you decide to join the full-time RV lifestyle, you’ll need to be okay with a bit of minimalist living.

Damages and Repairs Can Set You Back

Like any other vehicle, RVs require regular maintenance to stay in pristine condition. This doesn’t just involve an oil change now and then, either. With RVs, you need to make time for examining the pipe and wastewater systems, roof and window sealants, and interior appliances in addition to under-the-hood maintenance.

You also need to be diligent about identifying signs of leaks or water damage and so forth. We think these things are well worth what you’d get in return. However, it’s not for everyone, and being prepared for any setbacks that damages or repairs can cause is crucial to living your best RV life. So keep this in mind when you’re making your decision about RVing full time.